Networking HQ BLOG with Larry James

Monday, May 21, 2018

No “Timid-Speak” Allowed At Networking Events!

Filed under: Networking,Shyness,Timid-Speak — Larry James @ 8:30 am

At a networking event and need a referral? Sorry ladies but this seems to be true: Women sometimes hedge requests about what they want because they’ve been conditioned to first be accommodating to others.

Accommodating others is a large part of networking, however, being too deferential can come across as meek, shy and timid causing other networkers to doubt your confidence or qualifications. Appearing as shy, they’ll wonder if you believe in yourself and, in turn, if they should trust you with their referrals.

Instead of mingling, some people, not just women, hide on the perimeter with a cocktail in hand to kill time and avoid talking to strangers. A wallflower attitude will never get you anywhere. Never favor the sidelines over the spotlight. Look around you when at a networking event. You will see the most successful networkers actively engaged in conversations with others. They are usually the leaders of the group and often the most successful members.

Shyness in not inherited, it’s developed via your past negative experiences. To be a successful networker you must liberate yourself from its socially degrading grip. Shyness has ruined many opportunities. It’s time to flip the switch to be bold. Those who have never suffered from shyness and timidity have no idea how debilitating it can be, especially for someone in a professional situation. Shyness can be overcome. With time and effort and a high desire to change, it’s possible to break through.

Timid-Speak can cause networking not to work for you. It can wreak havoc on your networking efforts. Timid-Speak has always been about struggling to connect with people you don’t know. It causes you to become apprehensive. Networking is about connecting! Don’t be intimidated by it or others. Everyone shies away and has moments, or extended moments, of self-doubt. But the fear is also a test, it means you are onto something big and you should pay attention to it and not shy away.

Is your potential career as a networker doomed? Not at all. Shyness is a habit that can be broken with the understanding that you can develop some new social skills. For the less outgoing, “attending a networking event can be like diving into a mosh pit,” says Nancy Ancowitz, business communication coach and author of Self-Promotion for Introverts. “It’s downright scary.” Networking isn’t easy, but it is crucial for your success.

Seize every opportunity to practice being more assertive. Speak up! Does that make you cringe? Sorry. Get over it. State clearing what you want. You must work to get over being shy and embrace talking to people. Demonstrate your confidence in yourself and what you do. You will be reprogramming your brain in a way that will make it easier and easier to overcome that still, small voice that says, “Shh! Be quiet.”

Keep your requests simple and straight-forward: “I’m looking for referrals to people who may be getting married and need a qualified Wedding Officiant.”

BONUS Article: Networking Relationships Begin With “Hello!”
Don’t be a Networking Wallflower
Networking for Introverts – Video
Working a Room If You’re SHY – No Pills Required

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netHQCopyright © 2018 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ comment Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Tips for Reading the Room Before a Meeting or Presentation

Filed under: Communication,Listening,Networking,Networking Meetings — Larry James @ 8:30 am
Tags:

Rebecca Knight, Guest Author

In every conversation at work, there’s the explicit discussion happening — the words being spoken out loud — and the tacit one. To be successful in most organizations, it’s important to understand the underlying conversations and reactions that people in the room are having. But if you aren’t picking up on those subtle cues, how can you learn to do so? What signals should you be looking for? And what can you do to influence the unspoken dynamics?

What the Experts Say ~ “Knowing how to read between the lines is a critical workplace skill,” says Annie McKee, a senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, and the author of How to Be Happy at Work. “You need to understand other people — what they want, what they don’t want, their fears, hopes, dreams, and motivations,” she says. “This builds trust. And trust is fundamental to getting things done.”

In addition, you must be aware of your effect on others, according to Karen Dillon, coauthor of How Will You Measure Your Life? “You need to be constantly assessing how other people are responding to you,” she says. “Some people find this easy and intuitive. For others, it’s a challenge.” The good news is that this skill can be learned. Here are some ways how.

Observe ~ The best way to read a room is to pay close attention to people — and not just what they’re saying. “If you’re relying [solely] on their words, you’re only getting half the picture,” McKee says. Upon entering a meeting, she recommends, do “a quick scan of the individuals,” noting “who’s next to whom, who’s smiling, who’s not, who’s standing, who’s sitting, and how much space is between people.” Next, try to pick up on “the almost invisible clues on how people are feeling” by looking carefully at “their facial expressions, posture, and body language.”

Be on the lookout for “quick microexpressions” such as “fleeting smiles, raised eyebrows, or even tiny frowns.” Vigilant observation will give you the information you need to interpret group dynamics. Dillon recommends identifying role models to further improve your social awareness. “Think of people you admire who are great at reading the room,” she says. “Isolate the things they do and try to emulate those.”

Control how much you talk ~ You can’t observe if you’re spending most of your time talking. You need to listen, Dillon says. “Be conscious of how much you are saying.” Whether you’re in a room with a large group of people, a small group, or you’re speaking with a colleague one-on-one, she advises taking frequent pauses “to really think about what the other person is saying” and watching out for the nonverbal cues. Don’t just wait for your turn to talk; there is “no shame” in silence. When the conversation is more intimate, Dillon says, you must strive to “make the other person feel heard.”

Be present. Be engaged. Make eye contact. “Position yourself so that you’re not inviting others to butt into your conversation. Help the other people feel confident that you are all in the moment together.” After the other person says something, paraphrase what they said to indicate that you’re paying attention. Similarly, “if the other person doesn’t seem to be hearing what you’re saying, and you start to realize that you’re talking at them, you should ask a question,” she adds. Try open-ended questions such as “What do you think about…?” or, “What are the consequences of…?” or, “Have you experienced this?” The answers to these questions help you uncover what’s really going on.

Interpret your observations ~ Once you’ve “tuned into the emotions and energy in the room,” you can “try to make sense of what you think you know,” McKee says. She recommends “generating multiple hypotheses about what’s going on.” Consider the people in the group more broadly and reflect on the possible reasons for their individual and collective emotional states. “What’s happening in their lives? What’s going on in their jobs? What do you know about these people?”

If you don’t know much, this can be tricky, but you can still come up with hypotheses for what’s motivating people. At the same time, you shouldn’t project your feelings onto the group. “Keep your emotions in check,” McKee says, adding that this is a feat that “takes tremendous skill and self-control.” If, say, the room is reverberating tension, don’t let yourself “be hijacked by negative energy, and don’t give in to your natural inclination to be frightened and angry.” Remember, too, that the emotions you perceive are not personal. “It probably doesn’t have anything to do with you.”

Check your hypotheses ~ When you’ve developed a few explanations for what’s going on in the room, check your understanding. You can do this by continuing to gather further information — though you should continue to be open to what you’re seeing and sensing so that you don’t fall prey to confirmation bias. You can also ask people directly, in private, McKee says. When you’re in one-on-one conversations, you might say something like, “In the meeting I saw you furrow your brow when discussion turned to the xyz project — how do you feel about it?”

Most likely, your colleagues will be pleased you noticed, she says. When you make note of people’s feelings and reactions, they “feel attended to.” Another tactic McKee suggests is talking with a trusted colleague, mentor, or coach. “Talk about what you’ve observed — not in a gossipy way, but as a learning opportunity,” she says. “You want someone else to check ideas with” so that you can say, “What do you think is going on with that colleague? Or that coalition?”

Put your perceptions into practice ~ If in the midst of a meeting or interaction, you notice that things are getting tense or heated, you can “take the opportunity to shift the emotional reality of the room,” McKee says. “Use humor,” she adds. “Or empathize with the group — make them feel okay.” She recommends determining who in the room has “the most social or hierarchical capital” and then focusing on getting that person on your side.

“It could be a person who has the most seniority, or the person who others are sitting closest to. It could be the person who’s telling jokes and has the ability to lighten the mood.” Keep an eye out “for any positive signals” — the executive in the corner who’s smiling, for instance — and concentrate on those. Importantly, continue to pay attention to what’s not being said. “Most people are just waiting to talk,” she says. As a result, “we may catch most of the words, but we miss the music.”

Principles to Remember

Do:

• Consider the people in the room more broadly and reflect on the possible reasons for their individual and collective emotional states.
• Look for microexpressions such as fleeting smiles or raised eyebrows. These offer clues to group dynamics and individual emotions.
• Isolate the behaviors that your socially aware role model exhibits and try to emulate them.

Don’t:

• Be distracted. Maintain eye contact and be present and engaged in conversations with others.
• Make it all about you. Ask open-ended questions to help you uncover what’s really going on.
• Allow yourself to be hijacked by a room’s negative energy. Keep your emotions in check and do what you can to shift the emotional reality of the room.

Case Study #1: Pay attention to people’s body language and facial expressions ~ As the chief human resources officer at Prosek Partners, the global PR company, Karen Niovitch Davis has a good deal of experience reading rooms. “I’ve had a 20+ year career in HR,” she says. “A lot of what I do is about trying to really understand what people are saying when they are not actually saying it.”

Every week, she attends a management meeting at Prosek for senior vice presidents, managing directors, and partners. The company’s CEO leads the meeting, and Karen, because of her role, is often aware of what’s on the agenda.

“Since some of the things that we discuss are sensitive or controversial, I am often prepping for how my colleagues will react,” Karen says.

Recently, for instance, the CEO announced that the company would be expanding and that it had signed a lease for more space in the building. Certain employees and teams would be moving to another floor.

Karen paid close attention to her colleagues’ body language and facial expressions to gauge their reactions. She was prepared for a mixed bag. “I knew everyone in the room was thinking: What does this mean for me? What does this mean for my team? Are we all going to have to move?” she says. “That’s human nature.”

Many of her colleagues seemed “genuinely pleased” by the news, she recalls. “They were excited because the move means we are growing.”

Others, however, gave off a decidedly different vibe. Some people’s faces went blank; others visibly frowned. One — we’ll call her Jane — looked down and scribbled a note to a colleague sitting next to her.

Karen assumed that Jane wasn’t looking forward to the prospect of moving. She thought about what she already knew about Jane. “She does not like to change her routine,” Karen notes.

Shortly after the meeting ended, Karen approached Jane. She told her that it seemed that she was unhappy about the move. “I wanted to make sure she knew I noticed her,” Karen says.

Jane appreciated that Karen noticed. “She said, ‘I don’t want to move because I like where my desk is now,’” Karen says. “She told me that she didn’t want to say anything in the meeting because she didn’t want to come off as not a team player.”

Karen listened attentively to Jane’s reasoning. She empathized with her and asked her open-ended questions about her concerns. She wanted to make sure Jane felt heard. “I told her that the office would be an exact replica of our current space and that the views would be better,” she says.

But Jane was not swayed by the argument. “I told her we would work something out so she would not have to move,” Karen says.

Case Study #2: Don’t assume you know how other people feel — ask them ~ Heather Anderson, an executive mentor at Vistage International, the San Diego–based advisory and executive coaching organization, says that she often speaks to her clients about the importance of social intelligence. “Emotions contain data,” she says. “I tell them that the emotional data they receive in their team meetings, their one-on-ones, and their client calls are just as important to their end game as anything else.”

She speaks from experience. Recently, Heather ran a meeting for one of her peer-to-peer coaching groups at Vistage. One of the agenda items was to provide feedback to one of the newer members — we’ll call her Susan. These meetings happen regularly; their purpose “is to challenge each other to be better leaders.”

“People are candid in these meetings and it can feel harsh if you’re on the receiving end — particularly when it’s your first time,” Heather says. “It’s intimidating.”

Heather first scanned the room to gauge the temperature; it wasn’t particularly tense, but she could tell that Susan was nervous. Next, she listened carefully to what others said. The comments were “frank,” and it wasn’t particularly positive.

She paid close attention to Susan’s body language. “I could see the look of surprise and fear on Susan’s face,” she says. “She shrunk in her chair and her shoulders dropped.”

Heather empathized with Susan’s emotions and reflected on what was happening. “I thought she felt threatened,” Heather says. “I wondered, ‘Should we soften our words?’”

To be sure, she asked Susan how she felt. “I said, ‘How are you feeling? What is it like to get this feedback?’”

Susan surprised her. “She said, ‘Wow. This is intense, but this is exactly what I signed up for.’”

Heather realized that she had projected some of her own feelings onto Susan. “I expected her to feel a certain way,” she says, “but you can’t assume you know.”

Later, Heather asked Susan how she planned to use the feedback she received during the meeting. “Susan was able to recite very specific action items, and she talked enthusiastically about the things she wanted to do and changes she wanted to make,” Heather says.

Heather plans to follow up with Susan in a few weeks.

Copyright © 2018 by Rebecca Knight. Rebecca Knight is a freelance journalist in Boston and a lecturer at Wesleyan University. Her work has been published in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Financial Times.

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netHQLarry James presents networking seminars nationally and offers Networking coaching; one-on-one or for your Networking Group! Invite Larry James to speak to your group! His latest book is, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

comment Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/

Monday, October 2, 2017

Others!?!

Filed under: Giving,Helping Others,Networking — Larry James @ 10:30 am

It is more blessed to give, than to receive! A great thing to remember when networking. A much better strategy is to lead with giving rather than taking.

Savvy networkers have learned to focus attention on others… instead of networking to get something! They know it pays great dividends. Networking is never about using other people as a means to an end.

Recently in a group of 28 networkers one member disclosed that he had lost his job. He looked like he had lost his best friend. He was known to be someone who almost always came to the meetings with 2 or 3 referrals for other members. I suggested that it might be a good idea for all members to focus on Jim and during the following week give him tips about looking for a new position.

Miracles do happen. The following week Jim reported that he receive at least one tip from every member that might help him get a new job. This week he came to the meeting in a suit and tie, his goatee and his long hair gone. He told of several members who suggested that if he would clean himself up and be better groomed, it might help. One suggested that he might also loose a few pounds. He showed up 4 pounds lighter and said his goal was a total of 18 pounds.

The position he landed was given to him by two members who both knew of the job opening. This time he had a big smile on his face.

So many people who are new to networking (and some who have been networking for a long time) come to meetings expecting to receive business leads and referrals, but to me they are missing the point. I’ve never understood this line of thinking. It’s all about giving to others, and I’m not just talking about business referrals, but anything you can do to be of assistance.

When you meet an inspiring new person, spend some time getting to know them to see how you might assist them. You might be surprised by how you might be able help. Focusing on what’s in it for you rather than taking the time to find out how you can mutually help each other is a mistake.

Never be put off by the fact that others in your network of support may not be as generous as you. Just keep on giving generously. Be an example of “giving!”

Here is my definition of Networking:

Networking is using your creative talents to help others achieve their goals as you cultivate a network of people strategically positioned to support you in your goals… expecting nothing in return! ~ Larry James

Networking is not for those who only take. It’s all about two things, building relationships, first and giving and helping others second. The more you do to help others, those things become the seeds that will eventually blossom into a giving tree for you. One that will eventually become a resource of everything you need to have a great career. AND… you have to give everything. Give everything… but UP!

BONUS Articles: Is It a Lead or a Referral?
Help Others – Give Before You Receive!
“How Can I Help You?”
Surround Yourself With “Givers!”

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netHQCopyright © 2017 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ comment Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

Thursday, August 24, 2017

4 Ways to Nail Networking

Filed under: Networking — Larry James @ 10:30 am

Kevin Dennis, Guest Author

This certainly won’t come as a surprise but bears repeating- networking is necessary for growing your business! Building a strong network creates a solid foundation for your company to expand and bring in more business, so if you haven’t been creating opportunities to meet new people, it’s time to reevaluate your schedule and make it a priority.

With that in mind, being strategic about your networking is the best way to ensure that you’re getting to know the right people and making the best impression possible. Here are some of my best practices for putting your best foot forward:

Choose Events That Fit Your Brand

There are many wedding and event industry associations that help bring professionals together, but they are each unique in their own ways. Do some research into the organizations around your area to see which best suits your brand and your values. If you find that the selection is limited in your market, consider starting your own group. Grab a few of your like-minded peers and start meeting regularly, then promote your meetings to other professionals in the area. Chances are they’ve been looking for the same opportunity as well!

Prepare As Much As Possible

Before attending a networking event, do your homework and find out who else is attending. Note anybody that you’d like to meet, so you can keep your focus while mingling. While you’re at it, research the venue and the sponsors of the event so you can get an idea of who is responsible (and who to thank at the end of the night!). Pick out an outfit that makes you feel confident and double check that your business cards are ready to go.

Don’t Forget To Smile

When you’re at the event, you want to come off as approachable so smile as often as possible. Don’t seclude yourself by the bar and wait for people to come to you, but at the same time, don’t lurk on conversations that are already midway through. Introduce yourself and practice your listening skills – ask questions to continue the conversation, but don’t hijack the conversation. When you make a solid connection, ask for their preferred method of communication and note it on their business card so you can follow up

Get Involved Further

While attending local events may be the first step to growing your network, consider getting involved to truly maximize your effort. Taking on a leadership role gives you exclusive insight into what’s happening in your market and it will also provide you with the opportunity to work and connect with key players that you may not have known. If you’re not ready to be in a leadership position, consider volunteering your products or services for an upcoming event – that way, you can get additional exposure for your work as well as get a taste of how increased involvement can impact your business.

The age-old adage is true – it’s not always what you know, it’s who you know. While it’s certainly important to have the skills and knowledge that make you an expert at your craft, it’s just as essential to know the right people who can help you in developing your business further.

BONUS Articles: Be a Network Volunteer!
Want to Stand Out in Your Networking Circles? Get Involved!
Making the Networking Follow-Up Call
How to Be a Red Ferrari in a Sea of Silver Cars
Feeling Like A Fraud? Stop Self Sabotage With This Unexpected Technique!
Don’t Push! – Pull

Copy-of-kevin-dennis-headshot-150x150.pngCopyright © 2017 – Kevin Dennis.  Kevin Dennis is the editor of WeddingIQ and the owner of Fantasy Sound Event Services, a full-service event company based in Livermore, California.

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netHQLarry James presents networking seminars nationally and offers Networking coaching; one-on-one or for your Networking Group! Invite Larry James to speak to your group! His latest book is, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

commentContact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/

Monday, November 9, 2015

Don’t Stop Networking! Just Start Doing It Right.

Ivan Misner, Guest Author

When I ask an audience, “How many of you are here hoping to possibly sell something?” almost everyone raises their hands. When I ask that same audience, “How many of you are here to possibly buy something?” nobody raises their hands.

Ever. Not one person.

NET-DontSTOPThis is what I call the networking disconnect. Too often, people show up at networking events wanting to sell something but nobody ever goes wanting to buy something. This is how networking can be done badly.

So, it didn’t surprise me when I recently read an article entitled “Stop Networking.” It went on to explain how the process of networking is so “mercenary.” The problem is that every example the author gave about how networking doesn’t work was an example of really bad networking! The conclusion was to stop networking. Instead of networking, the author said you should do these five things:

1. Focus on relationships, not transactions.

2. Don’t ask for something before you give something.

3. Don’t make the process about you.

4. Strive for quality, not quantity, in your relationships.

5. Volunteer for leadership roles in organizations you belong to.

Hello! Does anyone notice that the emperor has no clothes? I would argue that all five of these strategies are, in fact, all about networking – but about networking done the right way. In this article, bad networking tactics were presented as the reasons that people should stop networking altogether. Networking can certainly be done badly, but networking itself isn’t bad. In fact, when it’s done right, almost everyone agrees it’s the best way to build a business.

Don’t stop networking. Just start networking right:

Relationships, not transactions ~ The key for networking events is to make solid connections with individuals so they will remember who you are when you do follow up with them. You want them to be interested to meet with you for coffee or lunch. If you go to networking events with the intention of just trying to sell to people, they won’t want to meet with you later because they know you’re going to pitch to them.

Invest in some social capital ~ If you want people to be eager to meet with you after networking events, the key is to find ways to help them. Think back to the people in my audience. Think about all the relationships that had the possibility of forming and how many of them most likely didn’t. If everyone focused on learning who they could help, as opposed to who they could sell to, imagine the relationships that might have been. Good networking is all about investing in some social capital before asking for a withdrawal.

Be interested, not interesting ~ It’s not all about you. Do you want to make a connection (especially if you are networking up to someone more successful than you)? If so, be interested in what they are doing. Don’t pitch them the moment you meet them. But wait, it never hurts to ask, right? Wrong! Contrary to popular belief, it is does hurt to ask for business before there’s any kind of relationship.

Quality over quantity ~ The only thing more important than the size of your network is the quality of your network. It’s a people puzzle, not a numbers game. It’s about finding out about the people you’re meeting with. It’s not about collecting as many cards as you can. If your network is a mile wide and an inch deep, you’ll never have a powerful personal network at your disposal.

Become engaged in the groups you belong to ~ If you really want to stand out in a network, volunteer and become a leader in it. It is amazing how much exposure you can receive when you are helping to run a group that you are active in. However, remember two things. First, just being a leader doesn’t mean you’ll get business. At some point, when you have developed a relationship, you do have to let people know that you’d like to do business with them. Second, whatever you do, don’t step down from a leadership role and then immediately quit the group. That really makes it look like you were there for only one reason (and the wrong one at that). Being a leader in a group is about giving back. The secondary benefit is that you can build great credibility.

I’ve built a global company with offices in more than 60 countries and I’ve done almost all of it by building relationships, networking, and getting referrals. My advice to you is, don’t stop networking. Just start networking right.

BONUS Articles: The Real Secret to Success Isn’t Really a Secret
Networking Is a Contact Sport
Be Self-Aware, Be Selfless, and Then Be Selfish

MisnerCopyright © 2015 – Ivan Misner. Adapted from “Avoiding the Networking Disconnect” by Dr. Ivan Misner and Brennan Scanlon. Called the father of modern networking, Dr. Ivan Misner is the Founder of BNI and the senior partner for the Referral Institute. He has written nine books, including his New York Times best seller, Truth or Delusion? Busting Networking’s Biggest Myths.

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netHQLarry James presents networking seminars nationally and offers Networking coaching; one-on-one or for your Networking Group! Invite Larry James to speak to your group! His latest book is, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Reinvent Yourself!

Many people who talk about reinventing yourself are talking about reinventing your business. I’d like to point out that the biggest percentage of those who come to me with a business problem do, in fact, need to reinvent their business, but first they fail to see that they need to reinvent themselves from the inside out first.

One of the most powerful and challenging crossroads is where personal and business sometimes collides. When your business is not working like you know it should, it’s time to take an honest look at yourself instead of blaming the market, your spouse, your boss, etc. Problems at home? Start there if you want business to work better. You’ve heard it before and I will say it again, your overall attitude about how your life is going has an enormous effect on how your business progresses.

NET-ReInventReinvention is easier said than done! Reinventing yourself can be exciting and scary and seldom ever smooth, but rewarding beyond what you can imagine.

“What would it be like to start living the life you’d love to live, and becoming the person who belongs in that life?” ~ Sharon Good

Most people just need a swift kick in the pants to get their attention. To be a driving force in business, you must first determine what it takes to propel your potential forward. That’s you. Not your business. There are so many things in our personal lives that affect nearly every aspect of the business side of things. Getting those things under control in your personal life gives you more choices and more control over your business interests.

For example: I spoke recently to a friend who was having trouble following up with clients who had already shown an interest in her business. To me, that’s a transaction that is about to be made. When I asked her what made her feel that way, she said she could never be sure how they were going to react or what they might say, etc., etc. “I feel like I am soliciting.” That’s because when you are selling your product or service, you are soliciting their business. Realizing that you cannot predict or control what others might say or do, you only need to move forward and follow-up regardless. A lack of effective follow-up is, in my opinion, one of the biggest mistakes salespeople make.

It is the possibility of failure – the anticipation of failure – that paralyses action and becomes the primary reason for failure and ineffective problem solving. The real problem is working past the fear and accepting that for you to make the sale, you have to ask for the order! Time to muster up some courage. True courage isn’t about not feeling fear; it’s about feeling fear and doing what needs to be done in spite what or how you feel.

When you have your act together in your personal life, you can very quickly begin to realize that you can maximize the benefits of what you have learned because the path you take to complete recovery affects the direction your business will grow.

Remember, we are talking about reinventing yourself from the “inside out” first. When you do that you begin to make some noise in business that will arouse interest in what you are doing business wise. You will notice small increments of positive change that can often baffle your competition. You feel better about yourself. You pay closer attention to your customers and clients and your business begins to blossom. It recharges your creativity. You let go of fear or anything else that keeps you stuck which creates a space for the unknown to work its magic. Staying stuck dims your sparkle. You discover new ways of being, sometimes on your own and often with a coach.

“Anger and negative emotions of all kinds are dependent upon blame for their very existence. As soon as you stop blaming other people for what has happened and take responsibility for the future, your negative emotions cease, your mind becomes calm and clear, and you begin to make better decisions.” ~ Brian Tracy

butterflyTake a break and get your life together! You are sure to emerge all charged up and ready for whatever is next.

Every person faces the challenges of quickly moving from what they are now to what they need to become to be competitive. Focusing on getting your personal act together can accelerate change, the single most important strategic weapon for business success.

I know from personal experience that when people and new ideas all come together, business can move further, faster. The time you invest in your own personal growth goes from a cost of doing business to something that can transform your entire business perspective.

Your company’s greatest strategic resource is you. To move up in the world you must make sure that your company sees progress in you and that not only will you do a better job for them, but you will empower others along the way and even surpass their expectations.

Sometimes your eureka moment is when you give up a stance – “I can do this by myself. I don’t need any help!” – and try something new like giving up having to be right! We often struggle with limiting beliefs or stories about ourselves that hold us back from trying new things. It’s important to take control of who we will become or risk never reaching our full potential.

You have the power to solve whatever challenges you are facing. Believe me. You do. And… you may need to ask for help! There is no shame is asking for assistance when you need it. Every business person should have several close friends, confidents, that they can go to for help. Having that kind of network of support is important to put together before you need it.

Things may happen around you and things may happen to you, but the only things that really count are the things that happen within you.

BONUS Articles: Making the Networking Follow-Up Call
How to Be a Red Ferrari in a Sea of Silver Cars
Feeling Like A Fraud? Stop Self Sabotage With This Unexpected Technique!
Don’t Push! – Pull

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netHQCopyright © 2015 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Collaboration and Beyond…

Collaboration is working together with others toward a common purpose to achieve shared goals and business benefits. For the last two decades, the call for collaboration has been a front-and-center mandate. Collaboration – quite literally, “laboring together” – is a set of behaviors based on shared experiences.

NET-collaborationIt’s called working together; addressing the challenges of maintaining good business. It’s a partnership that offers you new innovative ideas with someone with business knowledge, meaningful insights and the broadest range of capabilities. This should be someone you feel comfortable working shoulder to shoulder with – someone who can help you reach the next level of performance. Collaboration can be very useful in helping you become unstuck on problems because it brings together multiple viewpoints focused on finding solutions.

To transform your own business you need really good partners. They help you become an expert of today instead of tomorrow.

These partners are the kind of people you should have in your network of support in your networking group. If you struggle to develop relationship partners within your own networking group… you are probably in the wrong group.

I look at networking as an adventurous excursion or a shared adventure. Networking should be fun, never a struggle.

Helping each other facilitates close business relationships. Again… collaboration is working together. As you learn from them, you also must remember to share your business knowledge with them.

Networking is about a lot of things; business referrals, etc., one of the most important of which is collaborating with each other.

How can I help you?

netHQCopyright © 2015 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Be a Network Volunteer!

Filed under: Networking,Volunteer — Larry James @ 8:30 am
Tags: , , ,

I have long been an advocate of volunteering… especially as it relates to business networking. One of the first steps toward networking your business is to become more visible in the the group and community the group services. It will help connect you with other members who share your passion for networking. By building these trusting relationships with other successful members, you essentially gain publicity for yourself and your business.

One of the smartest moves I ever made was starting my own networking group – The Tulsa Business Connection in 1975. Within 7 months, we had 47 members all in different business classifications. By the end of the year we had 65 members, 45 to 50 of which attended nearly every weekly lunch meeting we had. Dues were $40 per month, not including lunch. No one complained because they are all busy promoting themselves and our group and everyone was actively “looking” for business referrals for other members.

NET-VolunteerAttendance and dues are seldom a problem if everyone is doing their job; bringing at least one business lead every week and if they didn’t 25 cents went into the connection can. At the end of the meeting there was a drawing for those who did bring leads. Whoever’s card was chosen, won the “Connection Can Cash!” What a powerful group. The first year we exchanged nearly $2,000,000 in business leads for our members.

Anyone who had been a TBC member for more than 3 months knew that to volunteer to do something for the group was almost imperative. Those who didn’t volunteer were not that visible and as a result got very few referrals and eventually dropped out. We had many committees with about 5 members each who were responsible for various projects the group had chosen to support. Several were philanthropic. Our most popular committee was in charge of our “Quarterly Connections!” 4 time a year we would plan outside social events just for fun. Nearly member was involved in some kind of group activity.

I taught everyone to reach out to the community. Those who volunteered demonstrated their commitment to our group without concern for personal gain – and that was there too. Volunteering will always present new opportunities to help you spread the word about our group, your products/services and build affinity for our networking brand. Once our new President told me that she was have difficulty trying to do everything that was expected of her. The next meeting I asked for a volunteer to be assistant to the President and 14 hands went up. TBC was the largest, most active and most productive networking group in Tulsa for more than 15 years.

Several times we had special meetings and invited another networking group who was not doing so well to come and visit TBC to see why our group was doing so well. There was a substantial fee if they wanted me or someone deeply involved in our group to visit their group for one quarter to help them get on track and be more productive.

The Tulsa Business Connection established the first “Runaway Hot Line” with Tulsa Youth Services to help parents find their children who ran away. That news made the Tulsa World newspaper, every TV and nearly every radio station in town. We were all over the news and people were calling to join TBC.

For more info, click the book cover!

Volunteers quickly learned that they had to invest something into our group in order to get something out of it. Once the members knew the value of volunteering, hardly anyone said no when asked to help out with a group function. Here are a few of the ways they could volunteer:

• Registration Attendant to sign in attendees
• Greeter – This was a great position. You got to meet and greet everyone who attended
• Quarterly Connections – Party & social time – no networking
• Photographer – Photograph our special events
• President’s Assistant
• Printer – Volunteer to print TBC forms, weekly newsletter
• Videographer – Video our special events
• Special Seminar for newbies – once each quarter we would review our bylaws, help member design a “30-Second Connection” and offer tips that help them better network
• Volunteer Recruiters – Members who were assigned to recruit specific people thought to be good for our group
• Event Managers – Helped plan our special events
• Service Providers – Various professional service providers would come to an event and provide services to the attendees as a way to make the events better and showcase their product/service
• Spokesperson/Interviewer – For media interviews –
• Radio Broadcaster/PR – Helped prepare news releases, etc.
• Exit Interviewer – Our bylaws allowed for asking members who just came to the meetings and never offered business referrals to begin to do so (30 day warning) or they were very nicely asked to allow their business classification to be filled by someone else. (This may sound harsh, however, it was one way we kept the group full of savvy networkers and eliminated the leaches).

“Invest time in a cause that you care about. Volunteering puts you directly in touch with people who share the same values and passions – which can be a good foundation for working together or referring one another. Volunteer for an organization that you really care about. You’ll find new contacts and be making the world a better place at the same time. You may even be able to help your favorite charity with your business. Donate consulting time or manage a project pro bono and you’ll reap multiple benefits – new contacts, a project for your portfolio and contributing to a cause you care about.” ~ Ruben Gamez, Founder of Bidsketch.

Network group leaders: Design some ways you can help people in your group to volunteer to help your group. I promise it will make a terrific impact on the group and the attitudes of your members!

BONUS Article: Want to Stand Out in Your Networking Circles? Get Involved!
Volunteer and Become Visible
Community… Not Just a Buzzword!
Does Your Networking Group Have a “Community” Presence?

netHQCopyright © 2015 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

You Are Networking When…

Filed under: Networking — Larry James @ 7:30 am
Tags:

You are networking when you strike up a conversation with the person next to you in line, introduce yourself to other parents at your child’s school, happy hour, meet a friend of a friend, fitness/health clubs, fraternity/sorority meetings, catch up with a former co-worker, sitting next to someone at a Diamondbacks baseball game, non-networking events/meetings, picnics, places where you share a common cause, industry conferences, your alumni association, service organizations, or stop to chat with your neighbor.

NET-NetworkingWhenThe best way to make a favorable impression is to find a commonality with the person you’re talking to. The more personable your conversation, the better chance you have of easing into a later conversation about how to help each other business-wise. Look for common interests. When two strangers strike up a conversation, there is always a subtle jostling for position. Resist that urge. Go where the conversation leads.

Be an excellent listener. Put those skills to use. When you strike up a conversation, don’t attempt to launch into an awkward pitch for your business. Discover what others need and go about helping them. If they have a problem, offer to tell them what you would do in their situation and give your ideas away. The more people you meet and talk with, the larger your network and the greater the odds of finding the best customers, partners, employers or employees.

“If someone is making you uncomfortable for any reason – they’re talking way too much about themselves, engaging in over-the-top boasting, or seem sketchy in some way – then listen to your instinct and move along to networking with someone who feels more simpatico. Life’s too short to waste time on people you don’t enjoy.” ~ Kathy Caprino

Opportunities for business networking are everywhere! The professional networker knows this and takes every advantage to network as in the examples above. Just relax. Don’t try to impress. Tell stories and be yourself. Networking is the art and science of building professional relationships, but few of us are naturals at it. It takes practice. Networking is a skill. Skills take time and patience to develop.

EasiestWayThe average networker only networks when they know they have a networking meeting to go to and most are scrambling to come up with a business referral for other networkers on the way to the meeting. These groups can provide you with a shoebox full of business cards and no contacts if you’re not careful. Professionals plan ahead. Others often don’t like to network but think it’s something that they need to do to be successful. Few can actually tell you that they have done any research or attended any networking seminars to learn how to do it correctly.

While average networkers resist being held to an ill-fitting standard, professionals today do indeed need to find a way to muster the energy and courage to network and build a powerful support community. It’s been said that the professional networker can find what they need in their network of support in 3 to 5 phone calls. That’s what I call, “connected!”

If you only think of networking as going to a networking group or event, perhaps it’s time for you to get your creative juices going and actually plan to put networking at the very top of your list of things to do everyday! Remembering to networking can be as easy as posting reminders in your office, on your bathroom mirror, in your car or anyplace that can serve as a reminder.

While you are thinking about it… take a few Post-it® notes and write the word “NETWORK” in big capital letters and post reminders everywhere right now. Even though I network virtually all the time, it’s helpful for me to post occasional reminders that helps keep me focused and keeps business networking at the forefront.

So… Where are the best places to invest your time business networking? Everywhere and all the time!

netHQCopyright © 2015 – Larry James. Adapted from Larry’s latest book, Ten Commitments of Networking: Creative Ways to Maximize Your Personal Connections! Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

Friday, September 18, 2015

How to Choose a Networking Group

Filed under: Choosing a Group,Networking — Larry James @ 7:30 am
Tags: ,

Susan Bierly, Guest Author

Joining the right networking group can make or break your networking success. Once you take the “Networking Assessment” ask yourself the million-dollar question… Would you refer your #1 Client or your Mother to the members of the group? If the answer is no, walk away, no… RUN!

Things to consider:

NET-ChooseGroup• The type of companies involved (are they marketing to the same end user you are?)
• The percentage of B2B verses B2C members
• Would you have a sphere if you joined?
• How many people were sitting down before the meeting started? (should be zero)
• Are the infomercials (elevator speeches/30-second connections) professional, informative and timed?
• Do the members ask for something specific during his or her infomercial?
• How many referrals are being passed?
• When passing referrals, was there apparent successor “fluff”? People have a tendency to “ramble” and say how great everyone is when they have no referrals to pass
• How many members are in the group?
• How many members were absent the day you visited?
• Atmosphere – is it welcoming? Do they approach you and introduce themselves?
• Do they ask what you do and have a genuine interest in your answer?
• Was the meeting controlled and professional? Was there disruptive side bar chatter?
• Does the meeting start and end on time?
• Are members there early to network?
• Are there guests?
• Did they have a handout for guests on the sign in table?
• Does the group have a mentoring program?
• Did you walk away with the feeling of “I like these people and I felt comfortable?
• Did the facilitator and the members contact you by e-mail, phone or mail after the meeting?

Larry’s NOTE: There are many things to consider when choosing a networking group. Choose carefully. You will want your investment of time to be worth it. I always want to know if the group has a “community” presence. Use Susan’s suggestions and get more info from the Bonus Articles below.

BONUS Articles: Shop for a GREAT Networking Group… Then STOP!
Choosing a Networking Group
Networks that Fit
Networking Events — Which Event Or Organization Is the Right One for You?
Power Your Connections ~ Give Them Something to Talk About!

SusanBierlyCopyright 2015 – Susan Bierly. Susan Bierly is Co-founder of CORE Networking, President of IMC Water Coolers and is an expert in personal and corporate training on sales and networking. Susan has successfully grown her companies over the past 27 years through networking; referrals and repeat business and has never engaged in paid advertising for any of her businesses. Feel free to reach out to Susan at susan@thecorenetworking.com if she can be of help to you or your organization.

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Larry James is a Professional Speaker, Author and Networking Coach. He presents networking seminars nationally and “Networking” coaching by telephone or one-on-one. Something NEW about Networking is posted on this Networking BLOG every 4th day! Visit Larry’s Networking Website at: “Networking HQ!”

the-archives2Click for Archives! ~ commentSubscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: CelebrateLove.com, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com and CelebrateIntimateWeddings.com

Subscribe to Larry’s FREE monthly “LoveNotes for Lovers” eZINE. Contact: Larry James, P.O. Box 12695, Scottsdale, AZ 85267-2695. – CelebrateLove.com

NOTE: All articles and networking tips listed in this BLOG – written by Larry James – are available for reprint in magazines, periodicals, newsletters, newspapers, eZINEs, on the Internet or on your own Website. Click here for details.

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Add Larry James as a “friend” to your Facebook page: http://www.Facebook.com/larry.james
Follow Larry’s “once daily” Relationship Tweet at: http://www.Twitter.com/larryjames
Follow Larry’s “Relationship BLOG” at: http://CelebrateLove.wordpress.com/
Follow Larry’s “Wedding BLOG” at: http://CelebrateIntimateWeddings.wordpress.com
Follow Larry’s “Authors & Speakers” BLOG at: http://www.AuthorsandSpeakerNetwork.wordpress.com/
Visit Larry James on LinkedIn
Follow Larry’s Networking on Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/NetworkingHeadquarters/timeline
Follow Larry’s Networking Pinterest Page @ http://www.pinterest.com/larryjames2012/networking-blog/!

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